The Paintrist Files
cavetocanvas:

Thomas Cole, River in the Catskills, 1843
From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:

At first glance, Thomas Cole’s River in the Catskills may seem like a typical nineteenth-century landscape, but it is in fact unusual among American landscapes of its time. Inspired by British notions of the picturesque found in natural scenery and Cole’s own writings on landscape, River in the Catskills presents an idyllic pastoral world removed from the realities of modern industrialization and urbanization. But one small detail, found upon close inspection of the background, sets it apart: a steam locomotive, an unequivocal symbol of industrial development. This work is considered to be the earliest known American oil painting to depict a train. 
As an uncommissioned work, River in the Catskills stands out among Cole’s several other painted versions of the natural scenery of the Catskills. The artist had moved to the town of Catskill in 1836 with his new wife, Maria Bartow. Over the years he had witnessed the town, also a major shipping port, grow and then decline, with an ultimately unfinished railroad development project that was in process for over ten years. In addition to squandering large sums of money and causing local conflict, the advent of the railroad worried local residents who treasured their familiar natural scenery. It was in this atmosphere that Cole began painting, and thus perhaps preserving, the landscape that surrounded him. Yet River in the Catskills diverges from Cole’s other renditions in its exploration of the tensions between nature and industry. Unlike other versions of the scene, this composition limits the lush greenery and includes the train, along with other markers of encroaching civilization: a collection of houses—probably a town—also appears; steam or smoke rises from the horizon, possibly indicating the presence of another train or a factory. In the foreground stands the scene’s main figure, a man in an eye-catching red coat, holding an axe, amidst a clearing of fallen trees. The attention drawn to the figure raises the question of man’s relationship to nature. Does the path to civilization and its improvements come only at the expense of clearing away the untouched American landscape?

cavetocanvas:

Thomas Cole, River in the Catskills, 1843

From the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston:

At first glance, Thomas Cole’s River in the Catskills may seem like a typical nineteenth-century landscape, but it is in fact unusual among American landscapes of its time. Inspired by British notions of the picturesque found in natural scenery and Cole’s own writings on landscape, River in the Catskills presents an idyllic pastoral world removed from the realities of modern industrialization and urbanization. But one small detail, found upon close inspection of the background, sets it apart: a steam locomotive, an unequivocal symbol of industrial development. This work is considered to be the earliest known American oil painting to depict a train. 

As an uncommissioned work, River in the Catskills stands out among Cole’s several other painted versions of the natural scenery of the Catskills. The artist had moved to the town of Catskill in 1836 with his new wife, Maria Bartow. Over the years he had witnessed the town, also a major shipping port, grow and then decline, with an ultimately unfinished railroad development project that was in process for over ten years. In addition to squandering large sums of money and causing local conflict, the advent of the railroad worried local residents who treasured their familiar natural scenery. It was in this atmosphere that Cole began painting, and thus perhaps preserving, the landscape that surrounded him. Yet River in the Catskills diverges from Cole’s other renditions in its exploration of the tensions between nature and industry. Unlike other versions of the scene, this composition limits the lush greenery and includes the train, along with other markers of encroaching civilization: a collection of houses—probably a town—also appears; steam or smoke rises from the horizon, possibly indicating the presence of another train or a factory. In the foreground stands the scene’s main figure, a man in an eye-catching red coat, holding an axe, amidst a clearing of fallen trees. The attention drawn to the figure raises the question of man’s relationship to nature. Does the path to civilization and its improvements come only at the expense of clearing away the untouched American landscape?

fleurdulys:
Thomas Cole - A View of Fort Putnam - 1825
In New York Cole sold five paintings to George W. Bruen, who financed a summer trip to the Hudson Valley where the artist produced two Views of Coldspring, the Catskill Mountain House and painted famous Kaaterskill Falls and the ruins of Fort Putnam. Returning to New York, he displayed five landscapes in the window of William Coleman’s bookstore; according to the New York Evening Post Two Views of Coldspring were purchased by Mr. A. Seton, who lent them to the American Academy of the Fine Arts annual exhibition in 1826. This garnered Cole the attention of John Trumbull, Asher B. Durand, and William Dunlap. Among the paintings was a landscape called “View of Fort Ticonderoga from Gelyna”. Trumbull was especially impressed with the work of the young artist and sought him out, bought one of his paintings, and put him into contact with a number of his wealthy friends including Robert Gilmor of Baltimore and Daniel Wadsworth of Hartford, who became important patrons of the artist.

fleurdulys:

Thomas ColeA View of Fort Putnam - 1825

In New York Cole sold five paintings to George W. Bruen, who financed a summer trip to the Hudson Valley where the artist produced two Views of Coldspring, the Catskill Mountain House and painted famous Kaaterskill Falls and the ruins of Fort Putnam. Returning to New York, he displayed five landscapes in the window of William Coleman’s bookstore; according to the New York Evening Post Two Views of Coldspring were purchased by Mr. A. Seton, who lent them to the American Academy of the Fine Arts annual exhibition in 1826. This garnered Cole the attention of John Trumbull, Asher B. Durand, and William Dunlap. Among the paintings was a landscape called “View of Fort Ticonderoga from Gelyna”. Trumbull was especially impressed with the work of the young artist and sought him out, bought one of his paintings, and put him into contact with a number of his wealthy friends including Robert Gilmor of Baltimore and Daniel Wadsworth of Hartford, who became important patrons of the artist.

bofransson:

Small Boats - Alfred Sisley

bofransson:

Small Boats - Alfred Sisley

colin-vian:

  Sisley - The Sevres Bridge (1877)

Alfred Sisley (30 October 1839 – 29 January 1899) was an Impressionist landscape painter who was born and spent most of his life in France, but retained British citizenship. He was the most consistent of the Impressionists in his dedication to painting landscape en plein air (i.e., outdoors). He deviated into figure painting only rarely and, unlike Renoir and Pissarro, found that Impressionism fulfilled his artistic needs.
Among his important works are a series of paintings of the River Thames, mostly around Hampton, executed in 1874, and landscapes depicting places in or near Moret-sur-Loing.

colin-vian:

  Sisley - The Sevres Bridge (1877)

Alfred Sisley (30 October 1839 – 29 January 1899) was an Impressionist landscape painter who was born and spent most of his life in France, but retained British citizenship. He was the most consistent of the Impressionists in his dedication to painting landscape en plein air (i.e., outdoors). He deviated into figure painting only rarely and, unlike Renoir and Pissarro, found that Impressionism fulfilled his artistic needs.

Among his important works are a series of paintings of the River Thames, mostly around Hampton, executed in 1874, and landscapes depicting places in or near Moret-sur-Loing.

brudesworld:

The Meeting of Oberon and Titania by Arthur Rackham, 1905

Arthur Rackham (19 September 1867 – 6 September 1939) was an English book illustrator.

brudesworld:

The Meeting of Oberon and Titania by Arthur Rackham, 1905

Arthur Rackham (19 September 1867 – 6 September 1939) was an English book illustrator.

jaded-mandarin:

Sir Joseph Noel Paton. Detail from The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania, 1849.

Sir Joseph Noel Paton FRSA, LL. D. (13 December 1821 – 26 December 1901 Edinburgh) was a Scottish artist.
Oberon (also spelled Auberon) is a king of the fairies in medieval and Renaissance literature. He is best known as a character in William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream, in which he is Consort to Titania, Queen of the Fairies.

jaded-mandarin:

Sir Joseph Noel Paton. Detail from The Quarrel of Oberon and Titania, 1849.

Sir Joseph Noel Paton FRSA, LL. D. (13 December 1821 – 26 December 1901 Edinburgh) was a Scottish artist.

Oberon (also spelled Auberon) is a king of the fairies in medieval and Renaissance literature. He is best known as a character in William Shakespeare’s play A Midsummer Night’s Dream, in which he is Consort to Titania, Queen of the Fairies.

monalisaphoenixmoon:

Midsummer Eve by Edward Robert Hughes
One of my favorite paintings. My mom’s 16th birthday card for me had this on the cover and I keep it in my desk.
Hung a copy of this in my room tonight to celebrate Midsummer
Happy Midsummer/Summer Solstice Eve, everybody! Time to get drunk, dance around a bonfire or in a fairy ring if you have one, wear flower crowns in an appropriate context for once (well, this and May Day), and read Shakespeare. For the next 24 hours, I shall only respond to the name of Peaseblossom. Because it’s cute. Carry on…

Edward Robert Hughes RWS (5 November 1851 – 23 April 1914) was an English painter who worked in a style influenced by Pre-Raphaelitism and Aestheticism. Some of his best known works are Midsummer Eve and Night With Her Train of Stars. Hughes was the nephew of Arthur Hughes and studio assistant to William Holman Hunt. He often used watercolour/gouache. He was elected ARWS in 1891, and chose as his diploma work for election to full membership a mystical piece inspired by a verse by Christina Rossetti’s Amor Mundi. He experimented with ambitious techniques and was a perfectionist; he did numerous studies for many of his paintings, some of which turned out to be good enough for exhibition.

monalisaphoenixmoon:

Midsummer Eve by Edward Robert Hughes

One of my favorite paintings. My mom’s 16th birthday card for me had this on the cover and I keep it in my desk.

Hung a copy of this in my room tonight to celebrate Midsummer

Happy Midsummer/Summer Solstice Eve, everybody! Time to get drunk, dance around a bonfire or in a fairy ring if you have one, wear flower crowns in an appropriate context for once (well, this and May Day), and read Shakespeare. For the next 24 hours, I shall only respond to the name of Peaseblossom. Because it’s cute. Carry on…

Edward Robert Hughes RWS (5 November 1851 – 23 April 1914) was an English painter who worked in a style influenced by Pre-Raphaelitism and Aestheticism. Some of his best known works are Midsummer Eve and Night With Her Train of Stars. Hughes was the nephew of Arthur Hughes and studio assistant to William Holman Hunt. He often used watercolour/gouache. He was elected ARWS in 1891, and chose as his diploma work for election to full membership a mystical piece inspired by a verse by Christina Rossetti’s Amor Mundi. He experimented with ambitious techniques and was a perfectionist; he did numerous studies for many of his paintings, some of which turned out to be good enough for exhibition.

gandalf1202:

Alfred Sisley - Boats being Repaired at Saint-Mammes [1885]
on Flickr.
[Sold for £276,500 at Sotheby’s, London - Oil on canvas, 38.1 x 55.2 cm]

Alfred Sisley (/ˈsɪsli/; French: [sislɛ]; 30 October 1839 – 29 January 1899) was an Impressionist landscape painter who was born and spent most of his life in France, but retained British citizenship. He was the most consistent of the Impressionists in his dedication to painting landscape en plein air (i.e., outdoors). He deviated into figure painting only rarely and, unlike Renoir and Pissarro, found that Impressionism fulfilled his artistic needs.
Among his important works are a series of paintings of the River Thames, mostly around Hampton, executed in 1874, and landscapes depicting places in or near Moret-sur-Loing.

gandalf1202:

Alfred Sisley - Boats being Repaired at Saint-Mammes [1885]

on Flickr.

[Sold for £276,500 at Sotheby’s, London - Oil on canvas, 38.1 x 55.2 cm]

Alfred Sisley (/ˈsɪsli/; French: [sislɛ]; 30 October 1839 – 29 January 1899) was an Impressionist landscape painter who was born and spent most of his life in France, but retained British citizenship. He was the most consistent of the Impressionists in his dedication to painting landscape en plein air (i.e., outdoors). He deviated into figure painting only rarely and, unlike Renoir and Pissarro, found that Impressionism fulfilled his artistic needs.

Among his important works are a series of paintings of the River Thames, mostly around Hampton, executed in 1874, and landscapes depicting places in or near Moret-sur-Loing.

Flying nudes paint by the Scottish artist Harry Holland

 (1941-)

Harry Holland is widely regarded as one of Britain’s best craftsmen, producing technically brilliant and very beautiful paintings. His style is distinctive and immediately recognisable, something which every artist seeks. The paintings are suggestive in the sense that they imply situations, events, or relationships that are not directly expressed; this imbues them with an engaging sense of mystery. A master of painting, Holland works with uncompromising commitment and sincerity to produce art that is intense and rewarding.

Holland was born in Glasgow in 1941. He trained at St. Martin’s School of Art from 1965-69. Since the 1970s this extraordinary classical artist has had over 30 solo exhibitions and figured in countless group exhibitions worldwide. Not surprisingly, his work has developed a substantial international following amongst collectors and has found its way into numerous important public collections world-wide including the Tate Gallery, British Museum, Metropolitan Museum of Art New York, National Museum of Wales, National Portrait Gallery Canada, Welsh Arts Council, European Parliament Collection, Belgian National Collection and the Fitzwilliam Museum Cambridge.

suum-cuique-tribuere:

George William Joy (1844 – 1925) was an Irish painter in London.

Top to bottom, then left to right:

The Bayswater Omnibus. 1895. Oil.

Nelson’s First Farewell. 1883. Oil.

Pamela’s Birthday. 1898. Oil.

Griselda. 1903. Oil.

General Gordon’s Last Stand. 1893. Oil.

The King’s Drum Shall Never Be Beaten for Rebels, 1798. 1892. Oil.