The Paintrist Files
spijkerschrift:

Asher Brown Durand (August 21, 1796 – September 17, 1886) was an American painter of the Hudson River School.

Durand was born in and eventually died in Maplewood, New Jersey (then called Jefferson Village), the eighth of eleven children; his father was a watchmaker and a silversmith.
Durand was apprenticed to an engraver from 1812 to 1817 and later entered into a partnership with the owner of the firm, who asked him to run the firm’s New York branch. He engraved Declaration of Independence for John Trumbull in 1823, which established Durand’s reputation as one of the country’s finest engravers. Durand helped organize the New York Drawing Association in 1825, which would become the National Academy of Design; he would serve the organization as president from 1845 to 1861.
His interest shifted from engraving to oil painting around 1830 with the encouragement of his patron, Luman Reed. In 1837, he accompanied his friend Thomas Cole on a sketching expedition to Schroon Lake in the Adirondacks and soon after he began to concentrate on landscape painting. He spent summers sketching in the Catskills, Adirondacks, and the White Mountains of New Hampshire, making hundreds of drawings and oil sketches that were later incorporated into finished academy pieces which helped to define the Hudson River School.
Durand is particularly remembered for his detailed portrayals of trees, rocks, and foliage. He was an advocate for drawing directly from nature with as much realism as possible. Durand wrote, “Let [the artist] scrupulously accept whatever [nature] presents him until he shall, in a degree, have become intimate with her infinity…never let him profane her sacredness by a willful departure from truth.”
Like other Hudson River School artists, Durand also believed that nature was an ineffable manifestation of God. He expressed this sentiment and his general views on art in his “Letters on Landscape Painting” in The Crayon, a mid-19th century New York art periodical. Wrote Durand, “[T]he true province of Landscape Art is the representation of the work of God in the visible creation…”
Durand is noted for his 1849 painting Kindred Spirits which shows fellow Hudson River School artist Thomas Cole and poet William Cullen Bryant in a Catskills landscape. This was painted as a tribute to Cole upon his death in 1848. The painting, donated by Bryant’s daughter Julia to the New York Public Library in 1904, was sold by the library through Sotheby’s at an auction in May 2005 to Alice Walton for a purported $35 million. The sale was conducted as a sealed, first bid auction, so the actual sales price is not known. At $35 million, however, it would be a record price paid for an American painting at the time.
Another of Durand’s painting is his 1853 Progress, commissioned by a railroad executive. The landscape depicts America’s progress, from a state of nature (on the left, where Native Americans look on), towards the right, where there are roads, telegraph wires, a canal, warehouses, railroads, and steamboats.
In 2007, the Brooklyn Museum exhibited nearly sixty of Durand’s works in the first monographic exhibition devoted to the painter in more than thirty-five years. The show, entitled “Kindred Spirits: Asher B. Durand and the American Landscape,” was on view from March 30 to July 29, 2007.

spijkerschrift:

Asher Brown Durand (August 21, 1796 – September 17, 1886) was an American painter of the Hudson River School.

Durand was born in and eventually died in Maplewood, New Jersey (then called Jefferson Village), the eighth of eleven children; his father was a watchmaker and a silversmith.

Durand was apprenticed to an engraver from 1812 to 1817 and later entered into a partnership with the owner of the firm, who asked him to run the firm’s New York branch. He engraved Declaration of Independence for John Trumbull in 1823, which established Durand’s reputation as one of the country’s finest engravers. Durand helped organize the New York Drawing Association in 1825, which would become the National Academy of Design; he would serve the organization as president from 1845 to 1861.

His interest shifted from engraving to oil painting around 1830 with the encouragement of his patron, Luman Reed. In 1837, he accompanied his friend Thomas Cole on a sketching expedition to Schroon Lake in the Adirondacks and soon after he began to concentrate on landscape painting. He spent summers sketching in the Catskills, Adirondacks, and the White Mountains of New Hampshire, making hundreds of drawings and oil sketches that were later incorporated into finished academy pieces which helped to define the Hudson River School.

Durand is particularly remembered for his detailed portrayals of trees, rocks, and foliage. He was an advocate for drawing directly from nature with as much realism as possible. Durand wrote, “Let [the artist] scrupulously accept whatever [nature] presents him until he shall, in a degree, have become intimate with her infinity…never let him profane her sacredness by a willful departure from truth.”

Like other Hudson River School artists, Durand also believed that nature was an ineffable manifestation of God. He expressed this sentiment and his general views on art in his “Letters on Landscape Painting” in The Crayon, a mid-19th century New York art periodical. Wrote Durand, “[T]he true province of Landscape Art is the representation of the work of God in the visible creation…”

Durand is noted for his 1849 painting Kindred Spirits which shows fellow Hudson River School artist Thomas Cole and poet William Cullen Bryant in a Catskills landscape. This was painted as a tribute to Cole upon his death in 1848. The painting, donated by Bryant’s daughter Julia to the New York Public Library in 1904, was sold by the library through Sotheby’s at an auction in May 2005 to Alice Walton for a purported $35 million. The sale was conducted as a sealed, first bid auction, so the actual sales price is not known. At $35 million, however, it would be a record price paid for an American painting at the time.

Another of Durand’s painting is his 1853 Progress, commissioned by a railroad executive. The landscape depicts America’s progress, from a state of nature (on the left, where Native Americans look on), towards the right, where there are roads, telegraph wires, a canal, warehouses, railroads, and steamboats.

In 2007, the Brooklyn Museum exhibited nearly sixty of Durand’s works in the first monographic exhibition devoted to the painter in more than thirty-five years. The show, entitled “Kindred Spirits: Asher B. Durand and the American Landscape,” was on view from March 30 to July 29, 2007.

livre-d-art:

Asher Brown Durand
Ariadne Asleep on the Island of Naxos  (after John Vanderlyn)
1831 - 1835
43.5 cm (17.13 in.), x 49.21 cm (19.38 in.)
Metropolitan Museum of Art - New York, NY 

Asher Brown Durand (August 21, 1796 – September 17, 1886) was an American painter of the Hudson River School.
John Vanderlyn (October 18, 1775 – September 23, 1852) was an American neoclassicist painter.
Ariadne (Greek: Ἀριάδνη; Latin: Ariadne; “most holy”, Cretan Greek αρι [ari] “most” and αδνος [adnos] “holy”), in Greek mythology, was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete, and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios. She is mostly associated with mazes and labyrinths, due to her involvement in the myths of the Minotaur and Theseus. Her father put her in charge of the labyrinth where sacrifices were made as part of reparations (either to Poseidon or to Athena, depending on the version of the myth); however, she would later help Theseus in overcoming the Minotaur and saving the would-be sacrificial victims. In other stories, she became the bride of the god Dionysus, with the question of her background as being either a mortal or a goddess varying in those accounts.

livre-d-art:

Asher Brown Durand

Ariadne Asleep on the Island of Naxos  (after John Vanderlyn)

1831 - 1835

43.5 cm (17.13 in.), x 49.21 cm (19.38 in.)

Metropolitan Museum of Art - New York, NY 

Asher Brown Durand (August 21, 1796 – September 17, 1886) was an American painter of the Hudson River School.

John Vanderlyn (October 18, 1775 – September 23, 1852) was an American neoclassicist painter.

Ariadne (Greek: Ἀριάδνη; Latin: Ariadne; “most holy”, Cretan Greek αρι [ari] “most” and αδνος [adnos] “holy”), in Greek mythology, was the daughter of Minos, King of Crete, and his queen Pasiphaë, daughter of Helios. She is mostly associated with mazes and labyrinths, due to her involvement in the myths of the Minotaur and Theseus. Her father put her in charge of the labyrinth where sacrifices were made as part of reparations (either to Poseidon or to Athena, depending on the version of the myth); however, she would later help Theseus in overcoming the Minotaur and saving the would-be sacrificial victims. In other stories, she became the bride of the god Dionysus, with the question of her background as being either a mortal or a goddess varying in those accounts.

mdj4022:

Selected works by 19th century American painter Asher Brown Durand. Durand’s work is considered a part of the Hudson River School of painting, a movement in American painting typified by meticulously detailed landscapes of natural scenes in and around the Hudson River area and the surrounding mountains.

arcadiainteriorana:
Asher Brown Durand (American, 1796–1886) - The Catskill Valley - 1863
Oil on canvas.
Philbrook Museum of Art.

The Catskill Mountains or the Catskills are a large area in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of New York. They are located approximately 100 miles north-northwest of New York City and forty miles southwest of Albany, starting just west of the Hudson River. The Catskills occupy much or all of five counties (Delaware, Greene, Schoharie, Sullivan, and Ulster). As a cultural and geographic region, the Catskills are generally defined as those areas close to or within the borders of the Catskill Park, a 700,000-acre (2,800 km2) forest preserve protected from many forms of development under New York state law.
The Catskills are well known in American culture, both as the setting for many 19th-century Hudson River School paintings and as the favored destination for urban vacationers from New York City in the mid-20th century. The region’s many large resorts gave countless young stand-up comedians an opportunity to hone their craft. In addition, the Catskills have long been a haven for artists, musicians, and writers, especially in and around the towns of Woodstock and Phoenicia, New York.

arcadiainteriorana:

Asher Brown Durand (American, 1796–1886) - The Catskill Valley - 1863

Oil on canvas.

Philbrook Museum of Art.

The Catskill Mountains or the Catskills are a large area in the southeastern portion of the U.S. state of New York. They are located approximately 100 miles north-northwest of New York City and forty miles southwest of Albany, starting just west of the Hudson River. The Catskills occupy much or all of five counties (Delaware, Greene, Schoharie, Sullivan, and Ulster). As a cultural and geographic region, the Catskills are generally defined as those areas close to or within the borders of the Catskill Park, a 700,000-acre (2,800 km2) forest preserve protected from many forms of development under New York state law.

The Catskills are well known in American culture, both as the setting for many 19th-century Hudson River School paintings and as the favored destination for urban vacationers from New York City in the mid-20th century. The region’s many large resorts gave countless young stand-up comedians an opportunity to hone their craft. In addition, the Catskills have long been a haven for artists, musicians, and writers, especially in and around the towns of Woodstock and Phoenicia, New York.

rjtyler:

DURAND, Asher Brown
American painter (b. 1796, Springfield Township, d. 1886, Maplewood)
A Stream in the Wood
1865
Oil on canvas, 102 x 82 cm
Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid
A Stream in the Wood is also typical of Durand’s subject matter, as most of his paintings depict woods. He almost invariably uses the same compositional format, comprising a few trees in the foreground, an empty middle area, and beyond these a luminous sky which casts light on the valley. Durand’s paintings show nature in its wild state, without any sign of human presence, and glorify American nature as a new Eden.

rjtyler:

DURAND, Asher Brown

American painter (b. 1796, Springfield Township, d. 1886, Maplewood)

A Stream in the Wood

1865

Oil on canvas, 102 x 82 cm

Museo Thyssen-Bornemisza, Madrid

A Stream in the Wood is also typical of Durand’s subject matter, as most of his paintings depict woods. He almost invariably uses the same compositional format, comprising a few trees in the foreground, an empty middle area, and beyond these a luminous sky which casts light on the valley. Durand’s paintings show nature in its wild state, without any sign of human presence, and glorify American nature as a new Eden.

teatimewithnietzsche:

Nature / landscape paintings by Asher Brown Durand.

At one time in the world there were woods that no one owned.

— Cormac McCarthy, Child of God

Asher Brown Durand (August 21, 1796 – September 17, 1886) was an American painter of the Hudson River School.

toomuchart:

Asher Brown Durand, Mrs. Winfield Scott, 1831.

toomuchart:

Asher Brown Durand, Mrs. Winfield Scott, 1831.

16chakras:
Asher Brown Durand  (American 1796 - 1886) - Kaaterskill Clove, 1866

16chakras:

Asher Brown Durand  (American 1796 - 1886) - Kaaterskill Clove, 1866
books0977:

Daniel Huntington (American, 1816-1906) - Portrait of Asher Brown Durand (1857). 
 Oil on canvas.
In 1832 Durand (American, 1796-1886) dissolved his profitable engraving business and entered into a short, successful period as a portrait painter.  A financial panic in 1837 combined with encouragement from Thomas Cole led him to try landscape painting. This painting is based on a trip to Franconia Notch in 1855 where Huntington accompanied Durand.

Daniel Huntington (October 4, 1816 – April 19, 1906), American artist, was born in New York City, New York, the son of Benjamin Huntington, Jr. and Faith Trumbull Huntington; his paternal grandfather was Benjamin Huntington, delegate at the Second Continental Congress and first U.S. Representative from Connecticut.

books0977:

Daniel Huntington (American, 1816-1906) - Portrait of Asher Brown Durand (1857). 

 Oil on canvas.

In 1832 Durand (American, 1796-1886) dissolved his profitable engraving business and entered into a short, successful period as a portrait painter.  A financial panic in 1837 combined with encouragement from Thomas Cole led him to try landscape painting. This painting is based on a trip to Franconia Notch in 1855 where Huntington accompanied Durand.

Daniel Huntington (October 4, 1816 – April 19, 1906), American artist, was born in New York City, New York, the son of Benjamin Huntington, Jr. and Faith Trumbull Huntington; his paternal grandfather was Benjamin Huntington, delegate at the Second Continental Congress and first U.S. Representative from Connecticut.

vuillar:
Asher Brown Durand (1796 - 1886) - "The Indian’s Vespers" (1847), 

vuillar:

Asher Brown Durand (1796 - 1886)"The Indian’s Vespers" (1847)