The Paintrist Files

I’m going on a short hollyday.

See you all back in over a week!

fleurdulys:
Akseli Gallen-Kallela - Portrait of Edvard Munch - 1895
Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.
Edvard Munch (12 December 1863 – 23 January 1944) was a Norwegian painter and printmaker whose intensely evocative treatment of psychological themes built upon some of the main tenets of late 19th-century Symbolism and greatly influenced German Expressionism in the early 20th century. One of his most well-known works is The Scream of 1893.

fleurdulys:

Akseli Gallen-Kallela - Portrait of Edvard Munch - 1895

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.

Edvard Munch (12 December 1863 – 23 January 1944) was a Norwegian painter and printmaker whose intensely evocative treatment of psychological themes built upon some of the main tenets of late 19th-century Symbolism and greatly influenced German Expressionism in the early 20th century. One of his most well-known works is The Scream of 1893.

historicaltimes:

Finnish Painters Akseli Gallen-Kallela and Albert Edelfelt Painting in the Snow - 1893 .

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.
Albert Gustaf Aristides Edelfelt (21 July 1854 – 18 August 1905) was a Finnish painter.

historicaltimes:

Finnish Painters Akseli Gallen-Kallela and Albert Edelfelt Painting in the Snow - 1893 .

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.

Albert Gustaf Aristides Edelfelt (21 July 1854 – 18 August 1905) was a Finnish painter.

fleurdulys:
Akseli Gallen-Kallela - View of Lake Jamajarvi - 1889
Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.

fleurdulys:

Akseli Gallen-KallelaView of Lake Jamajarvi - 1889

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic. His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.

artemisdreaming:

The Island of the Blessed, 1902-03
Akseli Gallen-Kallela
See archive for more:  HERE   From Wiki:  Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic… His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.”  

artemisdreaming:

The Island of the Blessed, 1902-03

Akseli Gallen-Kallela

See archive for more:  HERE  

From Wiki:  Akseli Gallen-Kallela (26 April 1865 – 7 March 1931) was a Swedish-speaking Finnish painter who is best known for his illustrations of the Kalevala, the Finnish national epic… His work was considered very important for the Finnish national identity. He changed his name from Gallen to Gallen-Kallela in 1907.”  

laclefdescoeurs:
Akseli Gallen-Kallela - Forging of the Sampo, 1893, 
oil on canvas, 152 × 200 cm (59.8 × 78.7 in)
Ateneumin taidemuseo, Helsinki
Painting by Akseli Gallen-Kallela, depicting a scene from Kalevala, a Finnish epic poem. Smith Ilmarinen is forging the magical mill called Sampo, a centerpiece in many of Kalevala’s stories.

laclefdescoeurs:

Akseli Gallen-Kallela - Forging of the Sampo, 1893, 

oil on canvas, 152 × 200 cm (59.8 × 78.7 in)

Ateneumin taidemuseo, Helsinki

Painting by Akseli Gallen-Kallela, depicting a scene from Kalevala, a Finnish epic poem. Smith Ilmarinen is forging the magical mill called Sampo, a centerpiece in many of Kalevala’s stories.

allthingsfinnish:

"From his axe the sparks fly upward, From the oak-tree fire outshooting; Ere the axe descends a fourth time, Yields the oak with hundred branches, Shaking earth and heaven in falling. Eastward far the trunk extending, Far to westward flew the tree-tops, To the South the leaves were scattered, To the North its hundred branches.”                                       Runo II Kalevala                                       (Crawford translation)
The Great OakAkseli Gallen-Kallela
"In the illustration in the beginning of the second rune of the epic, the Great Oak is of outright apocalyptic appearance with its branches covering all living things. Later, the artist made several and light versions of the felled oak that bring to mind lightning or the residual image produced on the retina by bright effects of light.  The felling of the oak marked the beginning of farming.”
       Tuija Walhroos       The Gallen-Kallela Museum
 

allthingsfinnish:

"From his axe the sparks fly upward,
From the oak-tree fire outshooting;
Ere the axe descends a fourth time,
Yields the oak with hundred branches,
Shaking earth and heaven in falling.
Eastward far the trunk extending,
Far to westward flew the tree-tops,
To the South the leaves were scattered,
To the North its hundred branches.”
                                       Runo II Kalevala
                                       (Crawford translation)

The Great Oak
Akseli Gallen-Kallela

"In the illustration in the beginning of the second rune of the epic, the Great Oak is of outright apocalyptic appearance with its branches covering all living things. Later, the artist made several and light versions of the felled oak that bring to mind lightning or the residual image produced on the retina by bright effects of light.  The felling of the oak marked the beginning of farming.”

       Tuija Walhroos
       The Gallen-Kallela Museum

 

fleurdulys:
Akseli Gallen-Kallela - Marie Gallen at the Kuhmoniemi bridge - 1890

fleurdulys:

Akseli Gallen-KallelaMarie Gallen at the Kuhmoniemi bridge - 1890
deadpanaesthetic:

Akseli Gallen-Kallela, Aino Myth, Triptych, 1891.oil on canvas

The middle panel: 154 × 154 cm (60.6 × 60.6 in). The left and right panels: 77 × 154 cm (30.3 × 60.6 in), 
Ateneumin taidemuseo, Helsinki, Finland
Painting by Akseli Gallen-Kallela, depicting a scene from Kalevala, a Finnish epic poem. Aino was Joukahainen’s sister who was promised to the old and wise Väinämöinen in marriage after Joukahainen lost a magic singing match against Väinämöinen. Aino instead decides to drown herself.
The three pictures tell the story: the left panel one is about the first encounter of Väinämöinen and Aino in the forest, the right panel depicts mournful Aino weeping on the shore and listening to the call of the maids of Vellamo who are playing in the water. Aino has made her decision to choose death rather than her wizened suitor. The middle panel depicts the end of the story. Väinämöinen goes to fish for Aino in the lake that she entered. He catches a fish which he thinks to be a salmon and tries to cut her up with a knife, but the fish slips away from his hands and springs back into the water. Then the fish changes into Aino who proceeds to mock the old man, that he held her in his hand but couldn’t keep her. After that she vanishes for ever.
The Kalevala  is a 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology.
It is regarded as the national epic of Karelia and Finland and is one of the most significant works of Finnish literature. The Kalevala played an instrumental role in the development of the Finnish national identity, the intensification of Finland’s language strife and the growing sense of nationality that ultimately led to Finland’s independence from Russia in 1917.
The first version of The Kalevala (called The new Kalevala) was published in 1835. The version most commonly known today was first published in 1849 and consists of 23,795 verses, divided into fifty songs (Finnish: runot). The title can be interpreted as “The land of Kaleva” or “Kalevia”.

deadpanaesthetic:

Akseli Gallen-KallelaAino Myth, Triptych, 1891.
oil on canvas

The middle panel: 154 × 154 cm (60.6 × 60.6 in). The left and right panels: 77 × 154 cm (30.3 × 60.6 in), 

Ateneumin taidemuseo, Helsinki, Finland

Painting by Akseli Gallen-Kallela, depicting a scene from Kalevala, a Finnish epic poem. Aino was Joukahainen’s sister who was promised to the old and wise Väinämöinen in marriage after Joukahainen lost a magic singing match against Väinämöinen. Aino instead decides to drown herself.

The three pictures tell the story: the left panel one is about the first encounter of Väinämöinen and Aino in the forest, the right panel depicts mournful Aino weeping on the shore and listening to the call of the maids of Vellamo who are playing in the water. Aino has made her decision to choose death rather than her wizened suitor. The middle panel depicts the end of the story. Väinämöinen goes to fish for Aino in the lake that she entered. He catches a fish which he thinks to be a salmon and tries to cut her up with a knife, but the fish slips away from his hands and springs back into the water. Then the fish changes into Aino who proceeds to mock the old man, that he held her in his hand but couldn’t keep her. After that she vanishes for ever.

The Kalevala  is a 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology.

It is regarded as the national epic of Karelia and Finland and is one of the most significant works of Finnish literature. The Kalevala played an instrumental role in the development of the Finnish national identity, the intensification of Finland’s language strife and the growing sense of nationality that ultimately led to Finland’s independence from Russia in 1917.

The first version of The Kalevala (called The new Kalevala) was published in 1835. The version most commonly known today was first published in 1849 and consists of 23,795 verses, divided into fifty songs (Finnish: runot). The title can be interpreted as “The land of Kaleva” or “Kalevia”.

blastedheath:

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (Finnish, 1865-1931), Luminen maisema (Snowy landscape), 1908.
Oil on canvas, 39 x 34 cm.

blastedheath:

Akseli Gallen-Kallela (Finnish, 1865-1931), Luminen maisema (Snowy landscape), 1908.

Oil on canvas, 39 x 34 cm.